WSNC Local Programming

Downtown Jazz at Corpening Plaza, Friday July 20 – Opening act, Urban Standard II. Featured act, Willie Bradley, trumpet.

WSSU Integrated Marketing

 

The Occupational Therapy Department at Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) is examining 3D printing through a new transformative curriculum project. 

2018 Music Downtown with Althea Rene

Jul 6, 2018
Bobby Roebuck

2018 Downtown Summer Music Series Schedule

Jun 29, 2018
Downtown Winston-Salem Partnership

2018 Schedule: Downtown Jazz presented by the City of Winston Salem

Corpening Plaza at 237 W. 1st Street in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Concerts from 6pm to 9pm

June 15 – Opening Act – Titus Gant Quartet; Main Act- Nick Colionne

June 29 – Opening Act- Saundra Crenshaw; Main Act- Althea Rene Music Page

More News

Today's Schedule

Updated at 7:42 p.m. EST

"The good news is that your favorite President did nothing wrong!" President Trump tweeted Saturday morning. His message follows a New York Times report on Friday that his longtime lawyer, Michael Cohen, secretly recorded their discussion about payments to a former Playboy model who said she had a 10-month affair with Trump.

Limericks

Jul 21, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Predictions

Jul 21, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be the big hit at next year's Amazon Prime Day - Alonzo Bodden?

ALONZO BODDEN: For the website to work.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Helen Hong.

HELEN HONG: Russian For Dummies.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Mo Rocca.

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Jul 21, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now it's time for our final game, Lightning Fill In The Blank. Each of our players will have 60 seconds in which to answer as many fill-in-the-blank questions as he or she can. Each correct answer now worth two points. Bill, can you give us the scores?

The cows were silent on a recent July morning at Mill-King dairy farm in McGregor, Texas. They stood under shade trees, digesting their breakfast, while cicadas buzzed in the branches overhead.

"It's starting to warm up, so they're starting to get a little bit less ... frolicky," says Craig Miller, watching from the fence line.

His grandfather started this farm. Now he runs it, producing nonhomogenized milk from a mostly grass-fed herd. He says this cow behavior is exactly what he expects as the temperature rises.

A storm rolls in over the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana. The clouds are low and dark as distant lightning cracks over a green prairie. Wade Running Crane is starting to get wet.

"This is like a sign from Ashley that she's here," he says of his family friend Ashley Loring.

Ashley's mother, Loxie Loring, is standing next to him.

"She liked this kind of weather," she says. Her daughter also loved riding horses and writing poetry.

"She was outgoing," Loring says. "She wasn't scared of anything, And for how small she is, she was..."

This week in the Russia investigations: Two big questions about the second-most famous Russian in the world and Rod Rosenstein fires a warning shot.

Finnish fallout

No Hollywood screenwriter could get away with turning in a treatment for this week. The studio bosses would roll their eyes and ask for the story to be more plausible.

It's a haunting image. At dusk, hundreds of Rohingya refugees at a camp in Bangladesh are huddled around a projector, looking at something just outside the frame — a film about health and sanitation.

That photo, taken on an iPhone by documentary photographer Jashim Salam of Bangladesh, is the grand prize-winning photo of the 2018 iPhone Photography Awards.

Today, white yachts bob on the turquoise surface of Balaklava Bay, a quiet inlet hidden from the open waters of the Black Sea. But 30 years ago, the bay was a restricted military zone, filled with submersible giants of the Soviet navy.

Fake news. Record-low voting turnout. Frequent and false claims from elected officials. Vitriol in many corners of political debate.

These are symptoms we hear of all the time that our democracy is not so healthy.

And those factors might be why many states are turning to the traditional — and obvious — place where people learn how government is supposed to work: schools. More than half of the states in their last legislative sessions — 27 to be exact — have considered bills or other proposals to expand the teaching of civics.

Pages

@WSNCRadio on Twitter