Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

The FBI has opened a civil rights investigation into the vandalizing and burning of a black church in Mississippi. "Vote Trump" had been spray-painted on a wall.

Local authorities are still searching for the person or people responsible for the fire, which they have identified as an arson.

"When firefighters arrived at Hopewell Missionary Baptist Church Tuesday night, they found it in flames, and the 'Vote Trump' slogan written in silver spray paint on the outside wall of the church," Mark Rigsby of Mississippi Public Broadcasting reports.

Two U.S. service members were killed after taking fire in Afghanistan, the NATO says.

They were part of a group of military personnel working to assist Afghan partners in an attack on the Taliban, NATO said in a statement. Two other U.S. service members were wounded in the attack. The military has not released any of the service members' identities.

"Local officials later said they were investigating claims that civilians also were killed in the fighting, possibly in a retaliatory airstrike," The Associated Press reports.

A British court has ruled that the U.K. government must get approval from Parliament in order to initiate the country's departure from the European Union.

The High Court's decision is a blow to the government's plans for how to trigger a "Brexit."

For 26 years, Glamour magazine has reserved the "Women of the Year" award for, well, women.

Previous proposals for a male nominee were rejected "on the grounds that men aren't exactly hurting for awards in this world," the magazine writes. But this year, the glossy broke with tradition and named Bono as its first Man of the Year.

Bono was recognized for establishing a campaign called "Poverty is Sexist," which is "specifically aimed at helping the world's poorest women," Glamour writes.

A suspect is in custody in connection to the ambush-style killings of two police officers in the Des Moines, Iowa, area, according to police.

The two officers were shot and killed early Wednesday as they sat in their squad cars.

"The shootings appear to have been ambush-style attacks," police spokesman Paul Parizek said in a statement.

At least six people were killed when a school bus hit a car, careened into a pillar and struck a commuter bus in southern Baltimore on Tuesday morning, according to local police.

The bus was on its way to pick up a student, police say — there were no children on the bus at the time of the accident.

The series of crashes began when the yellow school bus struck the back of a Mustang. The driver of that car was injured, according to law enforcement officials.

More than 24 hours after an explosion struck a coal mine in southwestern China, 20 miners are still missing, state media report.

The Xinhua news agency says 35 miners were working at the privately-owned Jinshangou mine when the explosion happened Monday morning; two escaped alive, and 13 have been confirmed dead. (Early reports had suggested 15 deaths.)

Hundreds of rescuers are "working around the clock" to dig through debris and search for survivors, Xinhua reports.

Around 4,700 public transportation workers in Philadelphia went on strike at midnight, shutting down many of the city's transit options.

The members of the Transport Workers Union Local 234 and the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, or SEPTA, were unable to agree on a new contract.

The strike is causing widespread disruption, and raising concerns that if the situation is not resolved it may interfere with Election Day next week.

Voice recognition surrounds tech-loving Americans, from Siri to Google Assistant to Amazon Echo. Its omnipresence can make it easy to forget that making this technology has been really, really hard.

Understanding human speech is one of the most difficult frontiers in machine learning, and the biggest names in technology have devoted much time and money to conquering it. But their products still work for only a handful of languages.

Less prominent languages are still indecipherable to computers — even for text translations, let alone voice recognition.

On Sunday, India celebrated Diwali with lamps, candles, feasting and fireworks. Now, a day after fireworks for the festival of lights, New Delhi is choked with a thick, dark smog.

The celebrations sharply exacerbated the city's perpetual pollution problems — the BBC reports that in the wake of the fireworks, levels of extremely small particulate matter more than doubled over the course of a few hours.

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